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The Pics4Learning collection consists of thousands of images that have been donated by students, teachers and amateur photographers. Unlike many Internet sites, permission has been granted for teachers and students to use all of the images donated to the Pics4Learning collection.

Browse by topic, look at the most popular photos or do a search for specific images. Topics include  Animals, Countries, Education, Food, Geography, History, Signs, to name a few. Some of the over 50 topics have numbers in brackets – these refer to sub-topics i.e. Animals has 49 sub-topics which include Marsupials, Bats, Insects, etc.  In the Marsupial section, there are 96 jpg images which can be copied or downloaded and used in multimedia presentations and information reports.

Students can also contribute photos they have taken. An example activity could be setting the students the challenge of taking digital photos around your school of mathematical concepts e.g. acute angles, parallel lines or symmetry. These can then be uploaded to the Pics4Learning site. This activity is not only an authentic learning task to consolidate students mathematical understanding but also a very engaging activity where students would be using a range of ICT knowledge and skills as well as collaborative and decision-making skills.

http://www.pics4learning.com/details.php?img=greyroo5.jpg

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Introduction to the second year of the Math Connection Project: a Mathematical Problem Solving Workshop between international and public schools around the world. Find the website at http://mathconnections.wikispaces.com/. This collaborative project is designed to provide a place for students and teachers to share their experiences with Mathematics and discover the connection of mathematics study to their own real world experiences. This year’s project is centred about four CHALLENGES which will use a variety of online tools to engage your students’ in exploring and communicating their understanding of Maths within four different strands.

CHALLENGE 1: DATA ANALYSIS November – December

CHALLENGE 2: GEOMETRY January – February

CHALLENGE 3: NUMBER OPERATIONS March – April

CHALLENGE 4: MEASUREMENT May – June

Interested in participating?

The project is open to all elementary and middle school level classrooms from all over the world. Join in for just one time or as many CHALLENGES as they fit into your planning and schedule. Individual, small groups, or whole class examples are welcome. Email Linda at lvnitsche@gmail.com to answer any other questions you might have. 

Project Goals

  • Develop mathematical understanding across the standards of communication, connections, and problem solving.
  • Develop an understanding of the use of mathematics in everyday life.
  • Develop an understanding of the universality of mathematics across the world.
  • Engage students in discussions about mathematics with others across the world.
  • Develop collaborative skills across classes and countries.
  • Creatively communicate new understandings about Mathematics.

Wouldn’t it be great to have some Australian involvement!

 

Thank you to Vicki Davis for spreading the word!

This website (http://www.teachersdomain.org/) is a growing collection of downloadable multimedia resources and lesson plans. Currently the majority of resources are in the Science field (listed below) but they are planning to add Language Arts, Social Sciences and Mathematics resources. It has a free registration although you need to align yourself to your educational institution.

I am not a huge fan of downloadable Lesson Plan websites but this site has suggestions which are not only practical and constructivist but also resources and links which students could use. For instance, the Polar Sciences Special Collection focuses on issues relating to Global Warming effects on the Arctic and Antarctic.  The collection includes a fabulous range of interactives, documents, lesson plans and video clips which can be viewed online, with some downloadable. Each with a brief description and suggested year level e.g. Earth as a System (Grade 6 – 12) is a visualisation adapted from NASA maps and shows progressive global changes on a rotating globe. You can also turn captions on or off to accompany the clip.

The collection groups resources in 5 areas: Atmosphere, Ice, Oceans, People and Land.

 

 

The Science K-12 resources are listed in major strands and sub-topics:

Earth and Space Science (292 resources) i.e. Earth in the Universe, Earth System, Structure, and Processes, Water Cycle, Weather, and Climate

Engineering (204) i.e. Engineering Design, Materials and Tools, Systems and Technologies

Life Science (399) i.e. Ecology, Evolution and Diversity, Genetics and Heredity, Organisms and Their Environments, Regulation and Behavior, Structure and Function

Physical Science (395) i.e. Energy, Fundamental Theory, Matter, Motions and Forces

Thanks to Dean Mantz for sharing this website via Diigo.

 

https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/

The World Factbook contains up-to-date information about all countries in the world. This includes information about geography, government, transportation, communication and the people. It also has useful graphics for student research projects e.g. flags and maps.

The factbook provides an excellent source for data activities in Numeracy. It lists statistics related to a country’s geography as well as many other data lists e.g. population, birth rate, unemployment rate, oil production, mobile phone statistics and transportation figures. It also has Rank Order pages which lists the countries in order of a particular data field. Did you know that Andorra has the highest life expectancy? Where do you think Australia is on the list?

The Data strand in the Mathematics K-6 syllabus “addresses the need for all students to understand, interpret and analyse information displayed in tabular and graphical forms.” In combination with classroom activities, data gathering, spreadsheets and graphics software, there is a wide range of online interactive websites that can be used to develop students’ mathematical learning and understanding. One of these is Create a Graph (http://nces.ed.gov/nceskids/createagraph/).

The National Centre for Education Statistics (NCES), is located within the U.S. Department of Education and the Institute of Education Sciences, and is the primary US federal entity for collecting and analysing data related to education. Within this site, is the NCES Kids’ Zone (http://nces.ed.gov/nceskids/index.asp ) which provides, amongst other information, several games, quizzes and skill building activities about Maths, probability, graphing and mathematicians.

Create a Graph provides tools to produce five different graphs and charts. There is an online tutorial as well as instructions, examples and a scaffolded process to create the graph. For instance, for younger students or those new to a certain graph type, there is a Create a Graph ‘classic’ section. The following explanation is under the Pie Chart link:“There are all kinds of charts and graphs, some are easy to understand while others can be pretty tricky. There are so many different types because each one has a fairly specific use. Pie charts can be used to show percentages of a whole, and represent percentages at a set point in time. They do not show changes over time.”It also gives students the opportunity to create a graph with data from NCES as well as entering their own. For those students who already have mastered a basic understanding of graphs, the interface is slightly different. A graph type is chosen, and then following the tabs down the side, students enter the design, data and labels before previewing and printing.

Create a Graph is excellent if you want a transition graphing activity before tackling spreadsheets OR if your school or students’ home computers do not have spreadsheet software. It can also be used as a whole class graphing activity and a means to explain certain concepts in the data strand as well as a focus for experimenting with a variety of tools to organize, display and analyse data. 

 A WebQuest is an inquiry-oriented lesson format in which most of the information is researched via the web. The model was developed by Bernie Dodge and Tom March at San Diego State University in 1995 (http://webquest.org/index.php)In an interview with Linda Starr of Education World,  Bernie Dodge discusses some of the key aspects of using WebQuests (complete interview). 

Bernie describes why WebQuests are not just internet Treasure Hunts or research projects … The key idea that distinguishes WebQuests from other Web-based experiences is this: a WebQuest is built around an engaging task that elicits higher order thinking of some kind. It’s about doing something with information. The thinking can be creative or critical, and involve problem solving, judgment, analysis or synthesis. The task is more than simply answering questions or regurgitating what’s on the screen. The benefit to using WebQuests is that it puts more responsibility on the learners themselves. Usually, a WebQuest includes the following:

Introduction: an engaging first statement that draws the reader in while setting the stage for the WebQuest – includes the central question around which the WebQuest revolves.

Task: a description of the end result of the students’ work; the culminating performance or product that drives all the activities of the lesson.

Process: describes step-by-step how the learners will accomplish the task. Includes online (and offline) resources, role descriptions (if any), and guidance on individual steps in the process.

Evaluation: a rubric or other means to evaluate the final task.

Conclusion: final statement that may include reflections on the lesson or extensions of the content for further exploration.

With today’s Web 2.0 tools, a WebQuest can easily be set up on the internet, include multimedia and hyperlinks and be an exciting, engaging activity for students across the curriculum. It can form the basis for a COGs unit, a G&T activity in Literacy and Numeracy or a group activity in any KLA. 

Bibliography

Linda Starr – Education World

WebQuests in wikipedia 

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