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Recyclezone, the site for schools, children and teachers that tells you what’s what in the world of waste! Although this site (http://www.recyclezone.org.uk/home.aspx) from England is called recyclezone, recycling is only one of the things we can do about waste. The site addresses the 3Rs – reduce, reuse, recycle. The site has a number of areas including a Fun Zone, with interactive online games, Activity Zone, where there are activities like making paper and a Teacher Zone.

Teachers might use this site as part of a recylcing / conservation unit or a follow-up to Clean Up Australia activities. It could also be used as inspiration to the SRC or the Environment Committee to plan a school based event. Some of the online waste-related games include:

  • Rubbish Challenge – Can you get rid of your rubbish?
  • Rap with Recycler – Join in with Recycler’s Rubbish Rap.
  • Is your brain full of rubbish? – Test your knowledge with our Rubbish Quiz.
  • Virtual school – Does school have to be rubbish? Find out by exploring our virtual school.
  • How much of a waster are you? – Find out if you’re a waster with our lifestyle challenge.

In the Teacher Zone, there are ideas for integration into your classroom:

  • What your school can do about waste – Practical steps that your school can take to reduce, reuse and recycle its waste.
  • Broader picture – Includes an introduction to waste and Education for Sustainable Development.
  • Waste on the web – Recommended waste related websites for use by teachers, school managers and students.
  • Teacher’s resources – A library of teachers’ resource pages from ‘wasted’, Waste Watch’s education newsletter.
  • Waste in the UK Curriculum – would have relevance for Australian Curriculum
  • Waste education publications and support – education materials and support from Waste Watch and others

The website is managed by Waste Watch, which is a leading environmental organisation promoting sustainable resource management in the UK by campaigning for all areas of society to:

  • reduce resource consumption
  • maximise resource reuse
  • increase the percentage of waste they recycle

Melbourne, Australia had a tremor last night which registered 4.7 on the Richter scale. To take advantage of this current event in your teaching and the amazing up-to-date resources now available on the internet, visit U.S. Geological Survey Earthquake Hazards Program (http://earthquake.usgs.gov). Since the early 1990s, the magnitude and location of an earthquake have been available within minutes on the Internet. Now, as a result of work by the U.S. Geological Survey and with the cooperation of various regional seismic networks, people who experience an earthquake can go online and share information about its effects to help create a map of shaking intensities and damage. The map is available at http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqcenter/recenteqsww/.

The website also has a number of resources for teachers and students at http://earthquake.usgs.gov/learning/kids/. There are facts and information about earthquakes as well as activities, puzzles and animations. The Teacher section includes photos, PowerPoints and maps as well as other resources, although they favour a US perspective.

The map below was accessed from the website on 7/3/09 and shows the earthquake indicator near Melbourne as well as other earthquakes which have been recorded in the previous 7 days. Earthquake times are listed in USA time, so need to be converted to your local time.

Map showing latest earthquakes

Since October 2008, The Louvre website (http://www.louvre.fr/llv/commun/home.jsp) features a new host: Dominique-Vivant Denon. The first director of the museum has been brought back to life as an animated character! He has a multitude of stories to tell about the museum and its contents, together with anecdotes from his travels, and he’ll help both children and adults explore the Louvre Web site! He will also entice young and old into his workshop—an Aladdin’s cave of treasures and memories.

When on the Louvre’s home page, click on Dominique’s head (top right-hand corner) and he’ll pop up all over the place to give students some practical information, suggestions for the virtual visit, and facts and figures about the museum. His audio narration will tell  the kind of things people don’t usually tell you about the secret life of the artworks. Visitors will learn the full history of these artworks when you open the description pages. These histories are in a detailed written form.

Dominique’s workshop is full of clickable objects and creates an excellent interactive starting point for students. For instance, click on Dominique’s book: it’s full of amazing stories about the artworks. In the portfolio next to his writing desk, find the list of story-telling objects. There are always lots of things lying around in Dominique’s workshop to experiment with.

The Louvre’s collection covers Western art from the medieval period to 1848, formative works from the civilisations of the ancient world and works of Islamic art. Dominique narrates the history and aspects of some famous artworks which are contained in these collections. The collection is grouped into eight Departments, each shaped and defined by the activities of its curators, collectors and donors. These include Near Eastern Antiquities, Egyptian Antiquities, Greek, Etruscan and Roman Antiquities, Islamic Art, Sculptures, Decorative Arts, Paintings and Prints and Drawings.

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