You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Science’ category.

Biopix (http://www.biopix.com/Default.asp) is a collection of nature photos, primarily from Scandinavia. Images include detailed and colourful photographs of animals, plants, weather and landscapes. Biopix is used online by a wide range of students, teachers, researchers, photographers etc. as well as used professionally in a large range of publications.

The photos may be used for free with no permission by teachers, pupils and students at schools, universities and other educational facilities, for purposes related directly to the education. Typically reports, teaching material for single classes, talks, posters, Masters-, PhD-reports etc. The source should always be given and if the product is published on the Internet, a link to Biopix should be given.

Thanks to tee1962 Reagan for sharing

Advertisements

Recyclezone, the site for schools, children and teachers that tells you what’s what in the world of waste! Although this site (http://www.recyclezone.org.uk/home.aspx) from England is called recyclezone, recycling is only one of the things we can do about waste. The site addresses the 3Rs – reduce, reuse, recycle. The site has a number of areas including a Fun Zone, with interactive online games, Activity Zone, where there are activities like making paper and a Teacher Zone.

Teachers might use this site as part of a recylcing / conservation unit or a follow-up to Clean Up Australia activities. It could also be used as inspiration to the SRC or the Environment Committee to plan a school based event. Some of the online waste-related games include:

  • Rubbish Challenge – Can you get rid of your rubbish?
  • Rap with Recycler – Join in with Recycler’s Rubbish Rap.
  • Is your brain full of rubbish? – Test your knowledge with our Rubbish Quiz.
  • Virtual school – Does school have to be rubbish? Find out by exploring our virtual school.
  • How much of a waster are you? – Find out if you’re a waster with our lifestyle challenge.

In the Teacher Zone, there are ideas for integration into your classroom:

  • What your school can do about waste – Practical steps that your school can take to reduce, reuse and recycle its waste.
  • Broader picture – Includes an introduction to waste and Education for Sustainable Development.
  • Waste on the web – Recommended waste related websites for use by teachers, school managers and students.
  • Teacher’s resources – A library of teachers’ resource pages from ‘wasted’, Waste Watch’s education newsletter.
  • Waste in the UK Curriculum – would have relevance for Australian Curriculum
  • Waste education publications and support – education materials and support from Waste Watch and others

The website is managed by Waste Watch, which is a leading environmental organisation promoting sustainable resource management in the UK by campaigning for all areas of society to:

  • reduce resource consumption
  • maximise resource reuse
  • increase the percentage of waste they recycle

Melbourne, Australia had a tremor last night which registered 4.7 on the Richter scale. To take advantage of this current event in your teaching and the amazing up-to-date resources now available on the internet, visit U.S. Geological Survey Earthquake Hazards Program (http://earthquake.usgs.gov). Since the early 1990s, the magnitude and location of an earthquake have been available within minutes on the Internet. Now, as a result of work by the U.S. Geological Survey and with the cooperation of various regional seismic networks, people who experience an earthquake can go online and share information about its effects to help create a map of shaking intensities and damage. The map is available at http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqcenter/recenteqsww/.

The website also has a number of resources for teachers and students at http://earthquake.usgs.gov/learning/kids/. There are facts and information about earthquakes as well as activities, puzzles and animations. The Teacher section includes photos, PowerPoints and maps as well as other resources, although they favour a US perspective.

The map below was accessed from the website on 7/3/09 and shows the earthquake indicator near Melbourne as well as other earthquakes which have been recorded in the previous 7 days. Earthquake times are listed in USA time, so need to be converted to your local time.

Map showing latest earthquakes

Annenberg Media’s website for teachers (http://www.learner.org/) provides teacher resources for a number of KLAs. The site is more aligned with American 7-12 curricula but there are a number of excellent interactives which could be used in a K-6 Australian classroom.

In the Mathematics area, there is an engaging resource on 3D Geometry. There are 6 sections, including 3D Shapes, Surface Area and Volume and Test Your Skills. Teachers can use the online information and activities as a teaching resource and students can use it to consolidate their knowledge and understanding of the concepts. The lessons are structured sequentially and progressively build on skills.

Another useful interactive is Spelling Bee. A cloze passage is displayed with missing words which the student needs to type in … obviously spelling the words correctly. Content is divided into year groups with sub-levels for each year. Words and passages can be ‘read’ out by the computer and even better, the computer corrects the student’s spelling!

Have you programmed for a unit on Fairytales? There is an interactive called Elements of a Story, which takes you through creating the Cinderella story. Could be used by teachers as revision activities or consolidation for students who need extra scaffolding. As stated on the interactive: “This site features an interactive explanation of each literary element, which is then followed by a series of activities to enhance students’ understanding. Students will be asked to put plot developments into the correct order, select appropriate settings and characters, and sort events and exposition.”

Other features of the website are videos and support materials which are aimed at helping teachers understand concepts and background knowledge of some content areas of the curriculum e.g. How can we use rocks to understand events in the Earth’s past? You must sign up to use these but they are free if watched online.

fireshot-capture-30-interactives-www_learner_org_interactives

ARKive, www.arkive.org is a centralised library of films and photographs of the world’s endangered species. Hailed as the digital Noah’s Ark, it has won numerous conservation, education and communication awards since its launch by Sir David Attenborough in 2003, and has now profiled over 2,500 of the world’s endangered species, using over 3,000 movie clips and 18,000 photos – all freely available for schools.

Multimedia resources are organised in categories and alphabetical groups e.g. Threatened Species –> Mammals –> W –> Western gorilla. In this section there are 19 images and 11 videos of the endangered gorilla as well as information relating to its biology, habitat, threats and conservation. There is also a facility to view larger images which would be ideal for displaying on a SMARTBoard.

ARKive is an initiative of Wildscreen (www.wildscreen.org.uk), a UK-based educational charity working globally to promote the public appreciation of biodiversity and the conservation of the natural world, through the power of wildlife imagery.

Making use of the stunning imagery available at the award-winning ARKive website, ARKive Education, www.arkiveeducation.org provides downloadable, ready to use modules on a wide range of curriculum topics, suitable for geography, biology, environmental education and citizenship lessons.

Resources are organised in age groups (5-7, 7-11, 11-14, etc) and subjects (Science, Geography and Other). There is a mixture of PowerPoint and pdf files containing activities and information. For example, an 11-14 years Geography resource called Adaptations: Investigate the world of animal and plant adaptations, using camels, snow leopards and even palm trees as engaging multimedia examples. Use the question and answer video clips to test your students. There is also an online games section which has a few simple activities relating to animals and the environment.

In April 2008, at Google’s UK headquarters in London, Sir David Attenborough launched ARKive’s new layer on Google Earth. Sir David said, “Google has come together with Wildscreen, who have this unique distillation of images of the natural world, so that any one of us can go to a particular area on the globe and see what lives there. Google can take you to parts of the world where you can actually see a flock of flamingos and know whether they are there, or whether they are on the way out.” To download your free copy of Google Earth and view the ARKive layer visit http://earth.google.com. The ARKive layer can be found in the Global Awareness Folder in the layers panel.

This website (http://www.teachersdomain.org/) is a growing collection of downloadable multimedia resources and lesson plans. Currently the majority of resources are in the Science field (listed below) but they are planning to add Language Arts, Social Sciences and Mathematics resources. It has a free registration although you need to align yourself to your educational institution.

I am not a huge fan of downloadable Lesson Plan websites but this site has suggestions which are not only practical and constructivist but also resources and links which students could use. For instance, the Polar Sciences Special Collection focuses on issues relating to Global Warming effects on the Arctic and Antarctic.  The collection includes a fabulous range of interactives, documents, lesson plans and video clips which can be viewed online, with some downloadable. Each with a brief description and suggested year level e.g. Earth as a System (Grade 6 – 12) is a visualisation adapted from NASA maps and shows progressive global changes on a rotating globe. You can also turn captions on or off to accompany the clip.

The collection groups resources in 5 areas: Atmosphere, Ice, Oceans, People and Land.

 

 

The Science K-12 resources are listed in major strands and sub-topics:

Earth and Space Science (292 resources) i.e. Earth in the Universe, Earth System, Structure, and Processes, Water Cycle, Weather, and Climate

Engineering (204) i.e. Engineering Design, Materials and Tools, Systems and Technologies

Life Science (399) i.e. Ecology, Evolution and Diversity, Genetics and Heredity, Organisms and Their Environments, Regulation and Behavior, Structure and Function

Physical Science (395) i.e. Energy, Fundamental Theory, Matter, Motions and Forces

Thanks to Dean Mantz for sharing this website via Diigo.

 

When Google Earth was launched in 2005, a highly motivating and different perspective of the planet became available to millions of computer users. At first, educators used it to find their school and students’ houses, to explore the local community ‘from above’ and to ’fly around’ tourist attractions, geographical features and historical landmarks. In recent years, with advancing technology, Google Earth combines the power of Google Search, satellite imagery, maps, terrain and 3D buildings with multimedia and linked applications to provide teachers with an amazing array of information and resources. From Google Earth home page (http://earth.google.com/)

The new version of Google Earth has a number of exciting features, including being able to switch between Sky and Earth view. You can look at the stars, constellations, galaxies, planets and the Earth’s moon. Many photos and linked videos are now 3D objects that you can add, fly into and browse.

You can use the Search panel to find places and directions i.e. travelling from Sydney to Beijing. Teachers and students can add placemarks. For example, locate and add a place marker to show an excursion destination, the site of an historical event, or  location of a current event in the news. Some other features of Google Earth include being able to measure a distance or area size, email a view or image. You can print the current view of the Earth and show it on Google Maps. There is also a 3D Viewer to view the terrain.

To download Google Earth on to your computer, Mac or PC, visit http://earth.google.com/download-earth.html … it’s FREE!!

With Google Earth, you can place custom images and Google SketchUp 3D models over the view of the earth. Image overlays provide additional information and can be created or downloaded. For instance, download the Wilkins Ice Shelf overlay which allows a comparison to illustrate the expanse of devastation. Text and photos can be added to the overlay as well. The Image Overlay can be clicked on or off. This Antarctica overlay is available at http://bbs.keyhole.com/ubb/showflat.php/Cat/0/Number/1140191/Main/1139031/ . To find more overlays, just complete a Google search.  

Google Earth combines the power of Google Search with satellite imagery, maps, terrain and 3D buildings to put the world’s geographic information at your fingertips. From Google Earth home page (http://earth.google.com/)

  • Fly to a famous geographical landform or historical location.
  • View the area from above and zoom in to see roads, buildings and geographical features.
  • Tilt and rotate the view to see 3D terrain and buildings, or look up to explore the night sky.
  • Save and share your searches and favourites.

To download Google Earth on to your computer, Mac or PC, visit http://earth.google.com/download-earth.html … it’s FREE!!

Why not try these activities with your class:

1. View an image of your home, school or any place on Earth. Click Fly To and type pyramids. Google Earth flies you to the location.

2. Go on a tour around the world. In the Places panel, check the Sightseeing folder and famous landmarks. Click the Play Tour button.

3. View 3D terrain of a place – this is more fun with hilly or mountainous terrain, such as the Grand Canyon or Mt Everest. When the view shows the location, use the tilt slider to tilt the terrain.

4. Need to explain Earth’s rotation, the sun rising in the East or time zones? A zoomed out view of the Earth could help!

5. An exciting free gallery provides lots of extras for Google Earth e.g. Night Lights of the World. Matt Fox’s overlay illustrates the planet’s night time “light pollution,” with huge differences clearly visible as you fly from one continent to another. Check out, for instance, the difference between North and South Korea. 

If you like any of our ideas …

... or have some of your own that you would like to share, why not get involved by clicking Comment link under the post. Subscribe to Stepping Stones - a free newsletter for educators For your free copy, send an email to subscribe@stepuptraining.com.au or visit www.stepuptraining.com.au and fill in your email address.

Websites that are worth a visit ..

web statistics

Visitors from these countries …

free counters