You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘HSIE’ category.

Biopix (http://www.biopix.com/Default.asp) is a collection of nature photos, primarily from Scandinavia. Images include detailed and colourful photographs of animals, plants, weather and landscapes. Biopix is used online by a wide range of students, teachers, researchers, photographers etc. as well as used professionally in a large range of publications.

The photos may be used for free with no permission by teachers, pupils and students at schools, universities and other educational facilities, for purposes related directly to the education. Typically reports, teaching material for single classes, talks, posters, Masters-, PhD-reports etc. The source should always be given and if the product is published on the Internet, a link to Biopix should be given.

Thanks to tee1962 Reagan for sharing

Advertisements

Pixlr (http://www.pixlr.com/editor/) is an online image editor that allows you to upload your images and edit them in your browser (Firefox or Internet Explorer). Pixlr is perfect for students when they want to create or edit images to be used in multimedia presentat ions l ike PhotoStory, PowerPoint or imovie. They can also use it at home as it is online and free!
While it’s not the most full-featured image editor you will ever use, Pixlr makes it fairly easy to do some sophisticated graphics manipulation with images online. The Flash-based web app has an impressive set of tools, from graphics tools like paint, blur, pixelate and emboss, to layers and filters for masking and effects.
Students can create a painting using the pen and paint tools or import images from digital cameras or the web … or even better via a web address (URL). For instance, as shown in the example, students were given the task of studying rainforest birds and their characteristics. The students did a search for pictures of rainforest birds as part of their HSIE unit. When an appropriate graphic is found, the web address can be copied and pasted into the ‘Open from URL’ window. Pixlr will then open that graphic in its own window. With the lasso tool, the bird was selected, copied and pasted into the main project window. A selection of birds were copied and pasted into the project and text and drawings added. For example, foliage could be copied or drawn in. The finished graphic can then be saved as a jpg to import into other programs.
Pixlr has a number of features similar to PhotoShop and other quite expensive software applications and can therefore be used to teach many of the graphics skills students need. Pixlr uses built in Flash so you need to have a Flash plug in for it to work. If Pixlr doesn’t function automatically see http://www.adobe.com/ products/flashplayer/ for details.pixlr

Recyclezone, the site for schools, children and teachers that tells you what’s what in the world of waste! Although this site (http://www.recyclezone.org.uk/home.aspx) from England is called recyclezone, recycling is only one of the things we can do about waste. The site addresses the 3Rs – reduce, reuse, recycle. The site has a number of areas including a Fun Zone, with interactive online games, Activity Zone, where there are activities like making paper and a Teacher Zone.

Teachers might use this site as part of a recylcing / conservation unit or a follow-up to Clean Up Australia activities. It could also be used as inspiration to the SRC or the Environment Committee to plan a school based event. Some of the online waste-related games include:

  • Rubbish Challenge – Can you get rid of your rubbish?
  • Rap with Recycler – Join in with Recycler’s Rubbish Rap.
  • Is your brain full of rubbish? – Test your knowledge with our Rubbish Quiz.
  • Virtual school – Does school have to be rubbish? Find out by exploring our virtual school.
  • How much of a waster are you? – Find out if you’re a waster with our lifestyle challenge.

In the Teacher Zone, there are ideas for integration into your classroom:

  • What your school can do about waste – Practical steps that your school can take to reduce, reuse and recycle its waste.
  • Broader picture – Includes an introduction to waste and Education for Sustainable Development.
  • Waste on the web – Recommended waste related websites for use by teachers, school managers and students.
  • Teacher’s resources – A library of teachers’ resource pages from ‘wasted’, Waste Watch’s education newsletter.
  • Waste in the UK Curriculum – would have relevance for Australian Curriculum
  • Waste education publications and support – education materials and support from Waste Watch and others

The website is managed by Waste Watch, which is a leading environmental organisation promoting sustainable resource management in the UK by campaigning for all areas of society to:

  • reduce resource consumption
  • maximise resource reuse
  • increase the percentage of waste they recycle

Melbourne, Australia had a tremor last night which registered 4.7 on the Richter scale. To take advantage of this current event in your teaching and the amazing up-to-date resources now available on the internet, visit U.S. Geological Survey Earthquake Hazards Program (http://earthquake.usgs.gov). Since the early 1990s, the magnitude and location of an earthquake have been available within minutes on the Internet. Now, as a result of work by the U.S. Geological Survey and with the cooperation of various regional seismic networks, people who experience an earthquake can go online and share information about its effects to help create a map of shaking intensities and damage. The map is available at http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqcenter/recenteqsww/.

The website also has a number of resources for teachers and students at http://earthquake.usgs.gov/learning/kids/. There are facts and information about earthquakes as well as activities, puzzles and animations. The Teacher section includes photos, PowerPoints and maps as well as other resources, although they favour a US perspective.

The map below was accessed from the website on 7/3/09 and shows the earthquake indicator near Melbourne as well as other earthquakes which have been recorded in the previous 7 days. Earthquake times are listed in USA time, so need to be converted to your local time.

Map showing latest earthquakes

Annenberg Media’s website for teachers (http://www.learner.org/) provides teacher resources for a number of KLAs. The site is more aligned with American 7-12 curricula but there are a number of excellent interactives which could be used in a K-6 Australian classroom.

In the Mathematics area, there is an engaging resource on 3D Geometry. There are 6 sections, including 3D Shapes, Surface Area and Volume and Test Your Skills. Teachers can use the online information and activities as a teaching resource and students can use it to consolidate their knowledge and understanding of the concepts. The lessons are structured sequentially and progressively build on skills.

Another useful interactive is Spelling Bee. A cloze passage is displayed with missing words which the student needs to type in … obviously spelling the words correctly. Content is divided into year groups with sub-levels for each year. Words and passages can be ‘read’ out by the computer and even better, the computer corrects the student’s spelling!

Have you programmed for a unit on Fairytales? There is an interactive called Elements of a Story, which takes you through creating the Cinderella story. Could be used by teachers as revision activities or consolidation for students who need extra scaffolding. As stated on the interactive: “This site features an interactive explanation of each literary element, which is then followed by a series of activities to enhance students’ understanding. Students will be asked to put plot developments into the correct order, select appropriate settings and characters, and sort events and exposition.”

Other features of the website are videos and support materials which are aimed at helping teachers understand concepts and background knowledge of some content areas of the curriculum e.g. How can we use rocks to understand events in the Earth’s past? You must sign up to use these but they are free if watched online.

fireshot-capture-30-interactives-www_learner_org_interactives

Be part of a NSW ICT project! The Tooth Tally Project gives teachers a way to integrate an important event in the life of a child – losing a tooth – with Reading, Mathematics, Writing, HSIE and ICT. Using “lost tooth” data collected in the classroom, students will practise counting skills and collecting data. They will learn to make and interpret graphs, develop map skills and communicate through email. It’s a wonderful opportunity for children to realize that in spite of many differences children all around the world have many similarities, too.

To take part in the Tooth Tally Project (http://www.toothtally.com/default.htm) you’ll need to register your class before 1 February 2009. Registered classes will count and compare tooth data from 1 February 2009 until 30 April 2009. Your class will become part of a team competing against other teams for the grand Tooth Tally Title. The winning classes will receive a special Tooth Tally Project certificate and be acknowledged on this site as the biggest tooth wigglers and wobblers in the world!

The Tooth Tally Project has been running for 10 years under the capable direction of Lynda Smith, Technology Coordinator at Barwell Road Elementary School, Raleigh, NC, USA, who inspired and created this wonderful learning activity. In mid-2008 Lynda passed coordination of the Tooth Tally Project to Cheryl Hill, Computer Teacher at Lindfield East Public School, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

A wiki site is used to keep the tally and to communicate with each other. There’s a gallery of work samples, class comments and a photo album. For lots of lesson plan ideas from previous Tooth Tally participants visit our Teachers page.

A great way to kick off the Tooth Tally Project is the Tooth Fairy description activity. Participating classes are invited to do this activity and select a picture to upload to the wiki. Instead of trying to squeeze the Tooth Tally Project into an already packed teaching day, why not integrate it into your regular curriculum? There are heaps of ways you can use the Tooth Tally Project to teach your regular curriculum objectives. Many of these ideas have come from previous Tooth Tally teachers!

Thanks to Melanie for alerting me to this  interesting integrated project.

The Pics4Learning collection consists of thousands of images that have been donated by students, teachers and amateur photographers. Unlike many Internet sites, permission has been granted for teachers and students to use all of the images donated to the Pics4Learning collection.

Browse by topic, look at the most popular photos or do a search for specific images. Topics include  Animals, Countries, Education, Food, Geography, History, Signs, to name a few. Some of the over 50 topics have numbers in brackets – these refer to sub-topics i.e. Animals has 49 sub-topics which include Marsupials, Bats, Insects, etc.  In the Marsupial section, there are 96 jpg images which can be copied or downloaded and used in multimedia presentations and information reports.

Students can also contribute photos they have taken. An example activity could be setting the students the challenge of taking digital photos around your school of mathematical concepts e.g. acute angles, parallel lines or symmetry. These can then be uploaded to the Pics4Learning site. This activity is not only an authentic learning task to consolidate students mathematical understanding but also a very engaging activity where students would be using a range of ICT knowledge and skills as well as collaborative and decision-making skills.

http://www.pics4learning.com/details.php?img=greyroo5.jpg

ARKive, www.arkive.org is a centralised library of films and photographs of the world’s endangered species. Hailed as the digital Noah’s Ark, it has won numerous conservation, education and communication awards since its launch by Sir David Attenborough in 2003, and has now profiled over 2,500 of the world’s endangered species, using over 3,000 movie clips and 18,000 photos – all freely available for schools.

Multimedia resources are organised in categories and alphabetical groups e.g. Threatened Species –> Mammals –> W –> Western gorilla. In this section there are 19 images and 11 videos of the endangered gorilla as well as information relating to its biology, habitat, threats and conservation. There is also a facility to view larger images which would be ideal for displaying on a SMARTBoard.

ARKive is an initiative of Wildscreen (www.wildscreen.org.uk), a UK-based educational charity working globally to promote the public appreciation of biodiversity and the conservation of the natural world, through the power of wildlife imagery.

Making use of the stunning imagery available at the award-winning ARKive website, ARKive Education, www.arkiveeducation.org provides downloadable, ready to use modules on a wide range of curriculum topics, suitable for geography, biology, environmental education and citizenship lessons.

Resources are organised in age groups (5-7, 7-11, 11-14, etc) and subjects (Science, Geography and Other). There is a mixture of PowerPoint and pdf files containing activities and information. For example, an 11-14 years Geography resource called Adaptations: Investigate the world of animal and plant adaptations, using camels, snow leopards and even palm trees as engaging multimedia examples. Use the question and answer video clips to test your students. There is also an online games section which has a few simple activities relating to animals and the environment.

In April 2008, at Google’s UK headquarters in London, Sir David Attenborough launched ARKive’s new layer on Google Earth. Sir David said, “Google has come together with Wildscreen, who have this unique distillation of images of the natural world, so that any one of us can go to a particular area on the globe and see what lives there. Google can take you to parts of the world where you can actually see a flock of flamingos and know whether they are there, or whether they are on the way out.” To download your free copy of Google Earth and view the ARKive layer visit http://earth.google.com. The ARKive layer can be found in the Global Awareness Folder in the layers panel.

Dipity is a Web 2.0 application which allows chronological information to be entered and displayed as a timeline. It can then be shared via a blog or other website. The news headlines about our Olympics team below is an example of one your students could make. It is a ‘live’ timeline in that as events are reported, they are added to the timeline automatically. Any RSS feed can be used and I’m sure there will be heaps during the Olympics. Students could also research Olympic data from the past and enter manually … for instance, host countries, records for 100 metres, etc.

https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/

The World Factbook contains up-to-date information about all countries in the world. This includes information about geography, government, transportation, communication and the people. It also has useful graphics for student research projects e.g. flags and maps.

The factbook provides an excellent source for data activities in Numeracy. It lists statistics related to a country’s geography as well as many other data lists e.g. population, birth rate, unemployment rate, oil production, mobile phone statistics and transportation figures. It also has Rank Order pages which lists the countries in order of a particular data field. Did you know that Andorra has the highest life expectancy? Where do you think Australia is on the list?

If you like any of our ideas …

... or have some of your own that you would like to share, why not get involved by clicking Comment link under the post. Subscribe to Stepping Stones - a free newsletter for educators For your free copy, send an email to subscribe@stepuptraining.com.au or visit www.stepuptraining.com.au and fill in your email address.

Websites that are worth a visit ..

web statistics

Visitors from these countries …

free counters